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Assisted Suicide - A Feminist Issue

[10 January 1997]

(On 8 January 1997, the US Supreme Court heard oral arguments on doctor assisted suicide. In the Glucksberg and Quill cases doctors and some terminally ill people, who have all since died, challenge bans on assisted suicide. The following views are those of Barbara Waxman Fiduccia, who is associated with Not Dead Yet, a US disability rights organization opposing euthanasia.)

Disabled fear for lives as mercy killing gains acceptance

Ottawa Citizen, January 8, 1997

The Latimer Watch began as a voice for the disabled because Robert Latimer became a minor hero, a good father, a guy in a tough spot, a sad sod who offed his disabled daughter, Tracy, with carbon monoxide as she squirmed in the front seat of his truck.

High-Profile Cases Like Latimer Focus Attention: Disabled Vulnerable to Violence

by David Martin, Provincial Coordinator, Manitoba League of Persons with Disabilities

(Winnipeg Free Press, 6 Thursday 1997)

Just over 20 years ago, people with disabilities across Canada came together and formed organizations to promote the rights of disabled citizens. Our struggles in the early years focused on achieving such advancements as accessible transportation, the right to attend mainstream schools, and access to buildings.

Latimer Case: Crown application to appeal (1997)

IN THE COURT OF APPEAL FOR THE PROVINCE OF SASKATCHEWAN

BETWEEN:

HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN, APPELLANT

AND

ROBERT LATIMER

(DOB: MAR. 13, 1953), RESPONDENT

NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR LEAVE TO APPEAL AND NOTICE OF APPEAL

D. MURRAY BROWN, Q.C.
AGENT OF THE ATTORNEY GENERAL
FOR THE PROVINCE OF SASKATCHEWAN
3RD FLOOR, 1874 SCARTH STREET
REGINA, SASKATCHEWAN S4P 3V7

IN THE COURT OF APPEAL FOR THE PROVINCE OF SASKATCHEWAN

Have We Lost the Liberal Party's Support on Fundamental Human Rights?

(20 December 1996) — At the Federal level, Canada's Liberals have been initiating activities which make the community of persons with disabilities question whether Liberals have turned their back on fundamental human rights. There is a Liberal Bill in the Senate, making it easier for health care professionals to withhold life sustaining treatment and the Liberal Party has passed a resolution decriminalizing assisted suicide.

Judges grill Latimer lawyer at hearing

Questions asked about what jury might have decided without farmer's statement on daughter's death

The Globe and Mail 28 November 1996

Ottawa—Robert Latimer's lawyer was given a tough grilling yesterday as he urged the Supreme Court of Canada to toss out the Saskatchewan farmer's confession to killing his daughter.

Mark Brayford argued that the confession is not permissible because the police did not tell Mr. Latimer he was under arrest when they went to his farm after the girl's body was found.

Disabled: Latimer acquittal would signal grave danger

by Anne Kyle
Leader Post (27 November 1996)

Tracy Latimer couldn't walk, talk or feed herself, but the tragic death of the 12-year old Wilkie girl has come to symbolize the very essence of life.

On Tuesday, two dozen people joined members of the Saskatchewan Voice of People with Disabilities at a special memorial service at the Core Ritchie Centre to commemorate Tracy's life and to reaffirm the value of life.

"The service is a celebration of life," said Pat Danforth, a well-known advocate for people with disabilities.

Euthanasia on trial? Supreme Court to hear Latimer appeal today

by Kevin Connor
The Winnipeg Sun (27 November 1996)

If Canada's top court doesn't put away a man who killed his disabled child as an act of mercy, euthanasia could start to become a trend, local disability advocates say.

Today the Supreme Court of Canada will hear the appeal of Saskatchewan's Robert Latimer who was convicted of murdering his daughter Tracy, who suffered from cerebral palsy. At issue is how police obtained a confession from Latimer.

CCD Watching Supreme Court for Decision in Latimer Case

(26 November 1996) — When Robert Latimer's appeal is being heard, Catherine Frazee, a member of CCD's Human Rights Committee, will be present in the Supreme Court to monitor the proceedings and to be available to the media to present the perspective of Canadians with disabilities in this case. Other people with disabilities from the Ottawa area also plan to be in attendance. CCD hopes that the Court will reject the appeal and uphold the conviction. However, CCD recognizes that other verdicts are a possibility.

Andrea Halpin Murdered by Father

(21 November 1996) — On 14 November 1996, Andrea Halpin, 35, died as a result of a gun shot wound inflicted by her father Bernad Halpin, 75. Ms. Halpin had been labeled mentally handicapped. After he murdered Andrea, Bernard Halpin committed suicide. Andrea's mother died two years ago.

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