English

Latimer Case: Crown application to appeal (1997)

IN THE COURT OF APPEAL FOR THE PROVINCE OF SASKATCHEWAN

BETWEEN:

HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN, APPELLANT

AND

ROBERT LATIMER

(DOB: MAR. 13, 1953), RESPONDENT

NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR LEAVE TO APPEAL AND NOTICE OF APPEAL

D. MURRAY BROWN, Q.C.
AGENT OF THE ATTORNEY GENERAL
FOR THE PROVINCE OF SASKATCHEWAN
3RD FLOOR, 1874 SCARTH STREET
REGINA, SASKATCHEWAN S4P 3V7

IN THE COURT OF APPEAL FOR THE PROVINCE OF SASKATCHEWAN

Have We Lost the Liberal Party's Support on Fundamental Human Rights?

(20 December 1996) — At the Federal level, Canada's Liberals have been initiating activities which make the community of persons with disabilities question whether Liberals have turned their back on fundamental human rights. There is a Liberal Bill in the Senate, making it easier for health care professionals to withhold life sustaining treatment and the Liberal Party has passed a resolution decriminalizing assisted suicide.

Judges grill Latimer lawyer at hearing

Questions asked about what jury might have decided without farmer's statement on daughter's death

The Globe and Mail 28 November 1996

Ottawa—Robert Latimer's lawyer was given a tough grilling yesterday as he urged the Supreme Court of Canada to toss out the Saskatchewan farmer's confession to killing his daughter.

Mark Brayford argued that the confession is not permissible because the police did not tell Mr. Latimer he was under arrest when they went to his farm after the girl's body was found.

Disabled: Latimer acquittal would signal grave danger

by Anne Kyle
Leader Post (27 November 1996)

Tracy Latimer couldn't walk, talk or feed herself, but the tragic death of the 12-year old Wilkie girl has come to symbolize the very essence of life.

On Tuesday, two dozen people joined members of the Saskatchewan Voice of People with Disabilities at a special memorial service at the Core Ritchie Centre to commemorate Tracy's life and to reaffirm the value of life.

"The service is a celebration of life," said Pat Danforth, a well-known advocate for people with disabilities.

Euthanasia on trial? Supreme Court to hear Latimer appeal today

by Kevin Connor
The Winnipeg Sun (27 November 1996)

If Canada's top court doesn't put away a man who killed his disabled child as an act of mercy, euthanasia could start to become a trend, local disability advocates say.

Today the Supreme Court of Canada will hear the appeal of Saskatchewan's Robert Latimer who was convicted of murdering his daughter Tracy, who suffered from cerebral palsy. At issue is how police obtained a confession from Latimer.

CCD Watching Supreme Court for Decision in Latimer Case

(26 November 1996) — When Robert Latimer's appeal is being heard, Catherine Frazee, a member of CCD's Human Rights Committee, will be present in the Supreme Court to monitor the proceedings and to be available to the media to present the perspective of Canadians with disabilities in this case. Other people with disabilities from the Ottawa area also plan to be in attendance. CCD hopes that the Court will reject the appeal and uphold the conviction. However, CCD recognizes that other verdicts are a possibility.

Andrea Halpin Murdered by Father

(21 November 1996) — On 14 November 1996, Andrea Halpin, 35, died as a result of a gun shot wound inflicted by her father Bernad Halpin, 75. Ms. Halpin had been labeled mentally handicapped. After he murdered Andrea, Bernard Halpin committed suicide. Andrea's mother died two years ago.

Charles Blais, 6, Murdered by Mother

(13 November 1996) — Last week, Danielle Blais drowned her 6-year old son, Charles, in a bathtub in her north end Montreal home. Charles Blais was autistic. After killing Charles, Blais attempted, but failed, to take her own life. According to the Montreal Gazette, Blais has been charged with the premeditated murder of her son. ("Charged with murder, mother gets support," 8 November 1996)

Issues Raised by Latimer Case

[6 November 1996]

by Cal Lambeth

(Ms. Lambeth, who is the parent of a child with a disability, presented these comments at a Winnipeg Vigil for Tracy Latimer, 22 February 1995.)

An Open Letter from CCD Re: Robert Latimer Case

[November 1996]

To: Supporters of Disability Rights in Canada

The Latimer case signals grave danger for all people with disabilities. We must never lose sight of the responsibility which this danger invokes. If we are not all vigilant, too many more will be murdered like Tracy Latimer. Too many more will have to fight for their lives. Too many more voices will never be heard.

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